Pippin, tabby cat, showing his tummy

When is a cat not a cat?

I told you last week how we discovered that there was a mouse inside the kitchen door and that the male biped had a cunning plan. Here is what happened next.

Pippin has a bit of a reputation as a fearless hunter and the male biped said he’d encourage the mouse to come out so that Pippin could catch it. He sent Mulberry and me out onto the terrace, as he said we’d get in the way! It was easy for me to look through the glass in the terrace door, but Mulberry had to stand up on his hind legs to watch.

The biped taped some cardboard over the grille on the kitchen side of the door and then closed the door. He unscrewed the grille on the other side – we still couldn’t see the mouse as the door was hollow.

The female biped said she didn’t want to watch and went to the other end of the room, while Mulberry and I pressed our noses against the glass hoping to see everything. The male biped encouraged Pippin to sit a few feet away from the door. He then put a peanut on the floor fairly close to Pippin. A moment later the mouse appeared in the hole in the door and Pippin moved forwards, which scared the mouse back into the door – not surprising really!

Peanuts

Mouse treats!

The male biped moved the peanut a little farther away from the door and told Pippin he’d have more time to catch the mouse. We didn’t have to wait long before the mouse appeared again. It ran right under Pippin’s nose, picked up the peanut and ran back towards the door. Pippin pounced, but he was too late and the mouse disappeared into the door. The male biped said that he thought it was a field mouse or a wood mouse, but not a house mouse.

Wood mouse

Wood Mouse
from Wikipedia

I decided that, as it was in the door, it was more likely to be a dormouse looking for somewhere to sleep away the winter.

Hibernating dormouse

A sleeping dormouse
Attribution: By Krzysztof Dreszer (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Mulberry said he thought it was RebelMouse – he thinks he’s hilarious!

The female biped said, “Whatever type of mouse it is, it has no reason to come out for a while now!”

The male biped agreed that the mouse would probably take a while to eat the peanut, but he put another peanut on the floor and told Pippin to keep his eyes open. The mouse really liked those peanuts – it soon appeared and scurried right under Pippin’s nose, picked up the peanut and went back into the door. Pippin opened his eyes wide and watched it every step of the way but stayed as still as a statue.

The male biped said he’d try again. The same thing happened!

The female biped said that we had the best fed mouse in the neighbourhood and that she thought she had remembered where the mousetraps were packed. The male biped asked if he could get them and she said it would be easier for her as she knew what the box looked like. She soon came back with four mousetraps.

They were the type that is a little box with a door that drops down when the mouse enters. The mouse is unharmed and can be released outside. She put a peanut in each one and arranged them in an arc on the floor below the hole in the door.

The male biped said, “That’ll scare the mouse and make it stay in the door!”

She replied, “Maybe. That’s what I thought about the cat sitting by the door, but that was before I knew that the cat was the mouse’s pet!”

Pippin, tabby cat, showing his tummy

Pippin – the mouse’s pet, allegedly!

The male biped said, “Ouch! Cover your ears Pippin!” But then he asked, “Are you a cat or a mouse? Squeak up!”

While they were busy teasing each other, the mouse came out of the door. It went across and into a trap and the little door on the trap flipped closed.

The bipeds heard that and they both smiled. Pippin just sat there. The female biped said that she’d take the mouse outside and release it, while the male biped put the door back together.

I asked Pippin if the pressure of having an audience was too much for him. He said he could have caught the mouse easily, but there was a slight communication problem. He says he thought the biped wanted to catch it! He says he gave a demonstration of the required moves and sat there giving quiet encouragement.

Pippin is still not very pleased with me about telling this tale, especially the part that answers the question in the title. When is a cat not a cat? When he is the mouse’s pet!

See you next Wednesday!

When is a door not a door?

I’m going to answer that question and tell you about a rather strange door.

This incident happened soon after we’d moved into an old, stone house. There was an open fire in the kitchen which smoked badly if the kitchen door was closed. After they’d had to open all the windows to let the smoke out a couple of times, my bipeds decided to leave the door ajar when the fire was lit.

That’s the first answer to the question in the title – when it’s ajar (sounds like a jar)! There’s a better answer later!

It looked as though someone had tried to solve the problem of the smoking fire by making a hole in the door to allow air to flow through. They had covered the hole in the door with a metal grille on each side. It didn’t stop the fire smoking when the door was closed, but it did make the door very ugly!

Pippin the tabby cat sitting on the terrace

Pippin

One morning the cats were showing a lot of interest in this hole in the door. Pippin was sitting on one side of the door with his nose pressed against the grille and Mulberry was on the other side of the door in the same position. Even when the female biped mentioned breakfast, they didn’t move a muscle. She got down on her knees and peered at the door, but she couldn’t see anything. The cats stayed where they were.

Mulberry, Persian cat

Mulberry

The male biped appeared and asked what the cats were doing. The female biped told him they wouldn’t move but that she couldn’t see anything. He got down on his knees and peered into the grille, but he couldn’t see anything either. The cats still didn’t budge. The bipeds decided to have their breakfast.

They had almost finished when the male biped exclaimed, “There’s a mouse!”

A mouse

A mouse!

He then explained that he’d seen a mouse briefly appear and poke its nose through the grille to see if it was safe to come out. The mouse had decided it was safer to stay inside the door.

If only the bipeds had used their noses, they would have known there was a mouse there much sooner!

Here’s the second answer to the question: When is a door not a door? When it’s a mouse’s house!

The female biped was not enthusiastic about the idea of a mouse on the loose in the kitchen, but the bipeds hadn’t finished unpacking and couldn’t remember where they’d packed the mousetraps. It was a Sunday so the local shops wouldn’t be open to buy new ones. The male biped said he had an idea.

Pippin doesn’t think I should tell you the rest of the tale, he says he may never speak to me again if I do. That was a worrying reaction so I had a chat with Mulberry and asked him what he thought. He said that he (Mulberry) was concerned when I told the tale of his scary encounter with a chair, but everyone was sympathetic to his plight and he needn’t have worried at all. He said he was sure that Pippin would enjoy being the focus of attention.

So I’ll tell you about the male biped’s cunning plan and the part that Pippin played in it another time!

See you next Wednesday!

Protecting my bipeds

I really enjoyed World Smile Day last week. You all know that I was so excited about it that I couldn’t wait until the actual day to start the smiling. I was pleased to make new friends – I haven’t visited all of you yet, but I will soon! It was lovely to see so many happy, smiling faces!

Clowie, Pyrenean Mountain Dog, Great Pyrenees

I love meeting people and making them smile when I’m out and about with my bipeds. I’m always careful to sit politely and wait for the people I meet to show they want to make a fuss of me. This is because I know some people feel nervous of me as I’m large. I also enjoy making my bipeds laugh and smile at home by doing funny things, but there is something that’s even more important to me – that is to protect my bipeds.

It’s hardly surprising that protecting them is so important to me when you consider that my ancestors have honed their protective abilities for generations by looking after livestock in the mountains. Although I’m always on the alert for potential danger, I’m pleased that there have been less than a pawful of occasions when I’ve found it necessary to do anything more than give a warning woof. I’d like to tell you about one of those today.

It was late on a summer evening and it was getting dark. I was at home with the female biped. The doorbell rang and I went with her to answer the door. The hall was wide and there was a space to the side of the door where I sat. I could see clearly, but whoever was at the door would have to look sideways to see me.

My biped opened the door and there was a man there. He said he was selling manure for the garden. My biped told him that she wasn’t interested, but the man continued to talk. My biped kept repeating that she wasn’t interested, but the man just kept on talking. After a minute or two he began to move closer and closer to the front door.

My biped spoke louder than she had been, “I have said NO”, and at the same time she began closing the door.

The man placed a hand on the door and moved one of his feet onto the step, stopping my biped from closing the door. Before she could react, I gave a slight growl and stood up. My biped moved the hand closest to me slightly away from her side with the palm facing me, our silent signal for “wait” – so I stood still.

The man noticed me for the first time and a look of horror crossed his face. He leapt backwards as suddenly as a frog jumps! He landed awkwardly on the path about four feet away. His legs seemed to be a bit wobbly as he hurried away, calling back over his shoulder, “I have to go!”

Frog

I’d never seen a biped jump like a frog before!

My biped put a hand on my neck and we watched him go out of the gate before she closed the front door. Then my biped bent over and made a huge fuss of me. She told me how clever and good I am. The strange thing is that she praised me more for taking notice of her signal to “wait” than she did for scaring the nasty man away! But biped logic can be very difficult to follow – I try not to worry about it. I’m always pleased to accept praise and treats!

Even though it was funny to see a biped jump like a frog, I’m glad that I can be friends with most of the bipeds I meet!

See you next Wednesday!

Smile!

This Friday, 3rd October, is World Smile Day. The theme is, “Do an act of kindness. Help one person smile!”

Smiley

That sounds like a lovely idea to me! It would be wonderful if every day could be like that.

It’s something that is easy to get involved in as most of us animals enjoy making people smile. There will be a smile blog hop on Friday, you can find the details on Sugar’s blog.

I thought about what I could do to make all of you smile. I decided that many of my blogging friends have lovely smiles, so I would share a few pictures of them. I’m hoping you’ll smile with them! Enjoy their smiles in the gallery of photos and then I will introduce them to you and tell you where to find them.

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They all have interesting blogs. I’ve kept my introduction to a few sentences each. Just click on the small image at the side to visit them!

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Dakota of Dakota’s Den

Dakota, Sheltie, smiling Dakota is a Sheltie, or Shetland Sheepdog. He finds great books to review. He also gives his opinion on useful items and sometimes gives them away to his readers. He is fearless when it comes to tasting new treats! He has a knack for sniffing out interesting news. And he still finds time to have fun and make us laugh!

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Misaki of The Misadventures of Misaki

Misaki, a Malamute, smiling

I’ve seen Misaki grow from a cute and mischievous pup into a beautiful adult Alaskan Malamute. She entertains us with her adventures and experiences. She still indulges in the occasional spot of mischief! She was feeling a little unwell yesterday, so stop by to cheer her up!

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Love Is Being Owned by a Husky

Husky from owned by a husky There are three Siberian Huskies – Mika, Lexus and Koda. They live with three cats. Visit them to follow their adventures, read product reviews, get general training tips, see beautiful images, handmade jewellery – and all things Husky!

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Emma of My GBGV Life

Emma, Bailie and Katie at the lake, dogs Emma, on the right, and Bailie are French scent hounds (Grand Bassett Griffon Vendéen). Katie is a Kuvasz. They are probably the busiest dogs I know! Sometimes they are cooking treats that make me drool on my keyboard! But you don’t have to worry about them putting on weight – they take lots of exercise and they are often out and about on their adventures.
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Cupcake of Cupcake Speaks

Cupcake, smiling dog Cupcake is a very sweet dog who lives with an author of books for children. She hopes to be the star in a best seller one day and shares her insights into the writing process. Cupcake has a fun job – she visits the library, where children read stories to her. She looks very cute when she dresses up and does tricks.

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Living the Squeak Life

guinea pig close up This is the newest of the blogs I’m bringing to you today, it was started in February. They are very cute guinea pigs. Hop on over to see photographs of them – you’ll also find out what guinea pigs get up to every day and the sort of things they think about!

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Aspen of Tylersat99

Aspen, a Landseer puppy Aspen is the newest member of the family at Tylersat99. He was nine weeks old when this picture was taken. He’s grown a lot since then – he will be five months old tomorrow and weighs more than 70 pounds. He still has some growing to do to catch up with Mica, the adult Newfoundland, who keeps a watchful eye on him. You’ll find lots of great photos on their blog and don’t miss following along on one of the walks – you’ll wish you could be there with them!

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Other News

Savannah’s Paw Tracks

Savannah's Paw Tracks teaser for Oct 1 Today is the big day! Don’t forget to visit Savannah and find out what she is up to!

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“His Name was Ben” by Paulette Mahurin

Cover of His Name Was Ben by Paulette Mahurin “His Name was Ben” by Paulette Mahurin has recently been published. I haven’t read it yet, but the early reviews are fantastic! Clicking on the image at the side will take you to the book on Amazon. Profits from the book will help rescue dogs.

Many of you will remember Paulette from the interview she did with me – Spotlight on Paulette Mahurin.

You can visit her blog – The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap.
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I hope you’re all smiling.

Don’t forget to smile on Friday!

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